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December 7: Terry Drury

Terry’s Missouri hunt showcased not only the power of the PSE Fang crossbow, but also the power of friendship.

Still healing from his tree stand fall and feeling the painful effects, Terry was determined to get out and hunt the last half of Missouri’s archery season. With his injuries making it too difficult to shoot the bow, he turned to the Fang…but getting it dialed in was still too physical of a job for him.

Enter good friend and DOD team member Chad Kilmer.

Chad and Terry spent over six hours together shooting the PSE, analyzing each bolt’s flight characteristics, shooting field tips, then Rage practice heads, then the real deals. With each shot, Chad would step in to cock the Fang for Terry’s next firing. Together they meticulously found the bolts that flew best out of the Fang and worked those into the final selection for the quiver. In the end, bolts with a slight right helical proved to pattern the best.

Confident in his weapon, Terry set out for a hunt on the evening of December 6th. Temps were cold and ushered down by a northwest wind. The blind Terry sat in overlooked a field of standing beans and it didn’t take long for the deer to pile in and begin feeding…more than 40 of them, including a few shooters that never got within range. After the deer fed, they walked off into the timber and down into a hollow on their way to a field where Terry had another blind overlooking a BioLogic buffet of Maximum, Winter Bulbs and Sugar Beets, Radishes complemented by cut and standing corn. That’s where he’d be the next night.

December 7th found Terry down in the blind where all the deer the previous night had drifted off to. The blind was strategically located at a vortex where the BioLogic met the corn. As an added attractant, before the season began, he relocated a shingle oak just over 20 yards in front of the blind as a scrape tree.

At 3:30 pm deer began entering the field to feed, including a would-be shooter named Little Caesar. Had his rack not been busted up from fighting, Terry would have shot him that night. Another deer, the Fork One, presented himself too, but Terry believed he would be a giant the following season so passed on him also.

Finally, at 4:30 pm a wide eight stepped out into the field at 120 yards and looked around. Terry readied himself for a shot but after surveying the other bucks already in the field, this more timid buck snuck back into the timber.

Disappointed but still hopeful, Terry continued to wait.

As daylight waned and the other bucks moved on, the wide eight stepped back out and began feeding his way toward Terry. As the buck passed behind the scrape tree, Terry leveled the Fang out the blind window and prepared for the shot.

Once the buck was clear of the tree, Terry pulled the trigger on the Fang and in almost the same instant as the “chunk” of the Fang firing sounded out, the bolt struck the buck’s body a little forward and high…shoulder territory. When Terry saw the shot, he thought the deer was gone. Most compound bows can’t penetrate the dense shoulder bone in that area.

After reviewing the shot, it was clear that the bolt tipped with the Rage Crossbow Extreme punched into the deer at least 11 inches. The good blood trail affirmed his opinion. The buck laying 55 yards inside the timber confirmed it.

Had Terry not had the power of his PSE Fang, it’s likely he wouldn’t have harvested that deer. Had Terry not had a great friend like Chad to help him get setup, it’s very likely he wouldn’t have harvested that deer.

 As told to Tim Kjellesvik

Terry’s Missouri hunt showcased not only the power of the PSE Fang crossbow, but also the power of friendship.

Still healing from his tree stand fall and feeling the painful effects, Terry was determined to get out and hunt the last half of Missouri’s archery season. With his injuries making it too difficult to shoot the bow, he turned to the Fang…but getting it dialed in was still too physical of a job for him.

Enter good friend and DOD team member Chad Kilmer.

Chad and Terry spent over six hours together shooting the PSE, analyzing each bolt’s flight characteristics, shooting field tips, then Rage practice heads, then the real deals. With each shot, Chad would step in to cock the Fang for Terry’s next firing. Together they meticulously found the bolts that flew best out of the Fang and worked those into the final selection for the quiver. In the end, bolts with a slight right helical proved to pattern the best.

Confident in his weapon, Terry set out for a hunt on the evening of December 6th. Temps were cold and ushered down by a northwest wind. The blind Terry sat in overlooked a field of standing beans and it didn’t take long for the deer to pile in and begin feeding…more than 40 of them, including a few shooters that never got within range. After the deer fed, they walked off into the timber and down into a hollow on their way to a field where Terry had another blind overlooking a BioLogic buffet of Maximum, Winter Bulbs and Sugar Beets, Radishes complemented by cut and standing corn. That’s where he’d be the next night.

December 7th found Terry down in the blind where all the deer the previous night had drifted off to. The blind was strategically located at a vortex where the BioLogic met the corn. As an added attractant, before the season began, he relocated a shingle oak just over 20 yards in front of the blind as a scrape tree.

At 3:30 pm deer began entering the field to feed, including a would-be shooter named Little Caesar. Had his rack not been busted up from fighting, Terry would have shot him that night. Another deer, the Fork One, presented himself too, but Terry believed he would be a giant the following season so passed on him also.

Finally, at 4:30 pm a wide eight stepped out into the field at 120 yards and looked around. Terry readied himself for a shot but after surveying the other bucks already in the field, this more timid buck snuck back into the timber.

Disappointed but still hopeful, Terry continued to wait.

As daylight waned and the other bucks moved on, the wide eight stepped back out and began feeding his way toward Terry. As the buck passed behind the scrape tree, Terry leveled the Fang out the blind window and prepared for the shot.

Once the buck was clear of the tree, Terry pulled the trigger on the Fang and in almost the same instant as the “chunk” of the Fang firing sounded out, the bolt struck the buck’s body a little forward and high…shoulder territory. When Terry saw the shot, he thought the deer was gone. Most compound bows can’t penetrate the dense shoulder bone in that area.

After reviewing the shot, it was clear that the bolt tipped with the Rage Crossbow Extreme punched into the deer at least 11 inches. The good blood trail affirmed his opinion. The buck laying 55 yards inside the timber confirmed it.

Had Terry not had the power of his PSE Fang, it’s likely he wouldn’t have harvested that deer. Had Terry not had a great friend like Chad to help him get setup, it’s very likely he wouldn’t have harvested that deer.

 As told to Tim Kjellesvik