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The hunt for this buck began in 2010 when he showed up on my Reconyx cameras shortly after velvet was off. He became a regular on the small piece of ground that I hunt. It wasn't until early November that I actually laid eyes on him while Bill and I were on vacation. We got video of him tending a doe and saw him three times in one week but weren't able to put him on the ground. If you look back at the Inner Circle we did a short clip on the encounter in early November. After the third encounter he suddenly disappeared and we wondered if he'd been killed. I never saw him again throughout the 2010 season and assumed he'd moved or been shot.


Roll ahead to the Summer of 2011 and I had all but forgotten about him. Daltyn and I had been doing a lot of long distant scouting and had been seeing a number of mature bucks so we weren't too concerned about it. Late July as we were glassing I happened to spot a large buck in the neighboring section across a gravel road from where we do most of our hunting. This section consists of a very large tillable piece of land ,a pond, and very few trees. It appeared that this buck was basically living in a very large standing corn field and feeding on soybeans in an adjoining field. Since we had permission to hunt this land also, Daltyn and I decided to hang a camera and see if we could get Reconyx pictures of the buck to see just how big he was. Two weeks later we pulled the card and as luck would have it we got a number of velvet photos of the buck. When we began looking at the pictures we realized that it was the same big Ten point that I had been hunting the previous year. He hadn't been killed, he'd just moved to the neighboring section and rode out the winter.


Realizing that this buck was four or five years old, we decided we wanted to try and take him come fall. With the buck living in the corn and knowing that as the beans turn in early fall they would probably not be very productive come hunting season. I decided to key in on the only water source in the section. The pond seemed to be the only logical spot for the buck to use on a daily basis so we moved the Reconyx to the edge of the water. I would be leaving for an archery elk hunt late September and check the camera immediately after I got back. After a nearly three week sit I returned from my elk hunt and pulled the card form my camera. My suspicions were right about the big buck using the pond as we had numerous pictures. I decided to brush in a ground blind on the edge of the bordering corn field where we had a complete view of the water. With the wind being perfect for a same day sit we settled into the blind around five O-clock. As darkness slowly approached we were only seeing does and began to pack camera equipment away. Suddenly Daltyn informed me that there was a big buck walking down a waterway directly across from the blind. We immediately recognized the buck as the big ten that we were there to try and take. Expecting the buck to walk directly to the water I helped Daltyn position himself for a shot. With the camera rolling and light fading fast the buck apparently felt content feeding in the standing corn instead of walking directly to the water. I told Daltyn to practice holding the crosshairs on the bucks side but to wait until I gave him the go ahead to shoot. By now light was fading quickly I knew that it would soon be to dark to video. With the buck standing broadside Daltyn assured me he had a steady hold on its shoulder. I told him to pulled the hammer back on the Pro Hunter, take a deep breath and squeeze the shot off. As the TC barked the buck folded where he stood. Daltyn made a perfect shoulder shot on the buck at seventy yards and we began the celebration.


This was Daltyn's second buck ever and his second for the wall in as many years. I couldn't be more proud of the way he is developing the love of the sport and an ambition to learn. At age ten he played as big a hand in locating and patterning this buck as I did and I couldn't be more excited that he was able to put the final piece of the puzzle together with a perfect shot.